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Mon5th Jan 2004
On the 5th January Blue 8 was noted in the Glendowan Mountains and Blue 4 was radio tracked in the Blue Stack Mountains. Blue 3‘s radio signal was picked up in Glenveagh on the 12th January. The signal lasted less then 10 seconds as if the bird was flying just outside of the glen. Despite further radio tracking, Blue 3 was not recorded since this brief encounter. Through an article in an Irish tourism magazine,…
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Fri5th Dec 2003
Yellow Horizontal Bar had been noted regularly near the park during October and November. Despite specific radio tracking searches for this bird it was not recorded during December or January. It would be disappointing if this three-year old female died. It may have dispersed in search of a better territory, in search of an established male or due to the presence of a large number of first year eagles. Alternatively, its transmitter/ battery may have…
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Wed5th Nov 2003
In early November 10 of the 11 first year birds were regularly located by radio in Glenveagh National Park. The remaining bird, Red S, had a faulty radio transmitter. The food dumps were frequently moved around the park and the eagles normally located the food dumps within a day or two. The eagles were even enticed to a food dump across Lough Veagh opposite Glenveagh Castle, but there were few public visitors present each morning…
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Sun5th Oct 2003
Despite full days radio tracking in the Glencolumbkille Peninsula, SW Donegal and the Inishowen Peninsula, North Donegal only four of the 13 older birds were noted in Donegal during September. However on the 2nd of October, Blue 0 was noted in the Blue Stack Mountains and Blue 8 was seen and recorded in the Derryveagh Mountains for the first time since 23rd May. Yellow Horizontal Bar was noted going to roost in Glenveagh that evening…
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Fri5th Sep 2003
It was noticeable that the heavier females were slower to take off from the food dumps, during misty and windless days, when disturbed. At times they appeared to be somewhat vulnerable. When placing food on the hillside the female wing tags were seen regularly whilst the males, if present, were recorded more often by their radio signals. Maybe the females also spend more time feeding at the food dumps. On one occasion Red L (a…
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