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Mon5th Jul 2004
Having returned from Scotland and after a few days radio tracking, several of the 2003 Golden Eagle cohort were noted in the Derryveagh Mountains. Red C, which had last been recorded in early March, was noted on a single day near Slieve Snaght, Derryveagh Mountains on the 7th July. Red F was noted between Slieve Toohey and Slieve League on the 7-8th July. Red K, T and X were noted in the Derryveagh Mountains later…
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Sun6th Jun 2004
As in previous years and due to a combination of reasons there was a decrease in eagle activity recorded during June. Blue O was noted in the Blue Stacks on the 11th and 17th July. 10 young Golden Eagles were collected from Scotland between the 14th June and 1st July 2004 during two separate trips. Five birds came from the Western Isles, including Skye, Mull and Canna and a further five were collected in Tayside,…
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Wed5th May 2004
Five of the eleven birds released in 2003 were located in the Northwest during May. Five others have not been radio tracked since February or March and are presumed to have dispersed. The eleventh bird has a failed radio transmitter and has not been located recently. Red F was noted in the Blue Stacks and the Derryveagh Mountains during May. Red K, N and T were constantly found visiting different upland sites in the Derryveagh…
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Fri5th Mar 2004
Yellow Two Spots and Yellow Diagonal Bar’s radio signals were noted near each other during early March. Blue 0, 5 and 8 were again located from various parts of the Derryveagh, Glendowan and Blue Stack Mountains during the month. All three birds were roaming over wide areas and were not settled in any one area for more than a week or so. On the 1st March there was a faint signal from Red A in…
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Thu5th Feb 2004
In general the 2002 and 2003 golden eagle cohorts were more sedentary during their first winter than the initial cohort released in 2001. The first red kite cohorts released in Northern and Central Scotland tended to be more dispersive than subsequent cohorts in both these release programmes also. The presence of some older birds probably helped anchor more of the newly released young in subsequent years. The release and presence of larger numbers of birds…
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